1. Home
  2. A to Z Index
  3. Academic Bankruptcy Policy
  1. Home
  2. Academic Affairs and Faculty
  3. Academic Bankruptcy Policy

Academic Bankruptcy Policy

Policy Author:
AVP Student Success

Responsible Office-Department:
Student Success

Effective Date of Policy:
August 23rd, 2021

Purpose:

The University’s academic bankruptcy policy is intended to allow students who are pursuing a new academic program and who are currently maintaining good academic standing to repair their cumulative grade point average (GPA) by “bankrupting” certain course work taken while pursuing their former academic program.

Scope and Applicability of this Policy:

Students who are pursuing a new academic program who wish to repair their cumulative grade point average, faculty advisors, Academic Advisors, Department Chairs, and the Committee on Academic Standards

Policy Narrative:

The University’s academic bankruptcy policy is intended to allow students who are pursuing a new academic program and who are currently maintaining good academic standing to repair their cumulative grade point average (GPA) by “bankrupting” certain course work taken while pursuing their former academic program. The record of course work taken and grades earned still appears on the student’s official transcript; however, both credits and quality point values are removed from the record of credits earned and the cumulative grade point average, respectively. A notation on the official transcript will indicate which courses have been bankrupted. Academic bankruptcy is available to undergraduate students (including students in linked undergraduate/ graduate programs) and some designated graduate programs. The following criteria apply to the undergraduate academic bankruptcy program. (Consult the departmental sections of the Graduate Catalog for details relative to graduate academic bankruptcy programs.)

  1. The student must have changed his/her major and maintained a minimum semester GPA of 2.50 for at least one full-time (minimum 12 credit hours) semester following the change of major. Consideration may also be given to a semester GPA based on part-time attendance if the student’s ordinary pattern of attendance has been part-time. 
  2. Application may be made no earlier than upon completion of the first full semester in the student’s new major, and no later than the semester before the semester of anticipated graduation. 
  3. Only courses required in the student’s former major may be bankrupted. Learning communities and other courses taken strictly for core credit may not be bankrupted. 
  4. No more than 18 credit hours may be considered for bankruptcy. Bankrupted coursework must have been taken in no more than two semesters (including summer sessions) and the semesters must be consecutive. 
  5. A bankrupted course may not be repeated. Therefore, if a specific course is still required in the student’s new major, it may not be bankrupted. 
  6. Regardless of the number of semesters or number of credit hours included in a student’s petition for academic bankruptcy, a student may declare bankruptcy only once. 
  7. A successful petition for academic bankruptcy has no retroactive effect on any academic determinations made prior to bankruptcy, including but not limited to: academic probation, suspension, or dismissal; determinations of ineligibility to pursue application to upper division/professional phase of University programs; Dean’s List eligibility; financial aid eligibility; or tuition liability. A student with bankrupted course work is eligible for graduation and other honors which are based on cumulative GPA. 

Procedures:

The student must submit a written petition to the Committee on Academic Standards, clearly identifying the specific course work for which bankruptcy is desired. A letter of recommendation from the student’s current faculty advisor should also be submitted. 

The Committee on Academic Standards will review the petition for compliance with program criteria and may, at its discretion, consider the entirety of the student’s academic record in rendering its decision.

Policy Violations and Consequences:

Note well: Students receiving financial aid should meet with a financial aid counselor prior to petitioning for bankruptcy to determine the effects of the petition on one’s present and future eligibility for aid.

Updated on April 22, 2022

Related Articles

Leave a Comment